Home China How Hong Kong Prepares for the Year of the Rooster

How Hong Kong Prepares for the Year of the Rooster

The Chinese New Year Flower and Gift Market is held in Victoria Park in Hong Kong every year during the weeks leading up to the holiday. This year, the market was especially crowded with people from all over the city.

The atmosphere was festive, with people purchasing their favorite items for the celebration. They came to buy flowers, plants, gifts, and colorful decorations, such as roosters and Fai Chuns.

B08I1972
The atmosphere is festive, with people purchasing their favorite items for the celebration. (Image: Monica Song)

Fai Chun is a traditional decoration that is frequently used during the Chinese New Year. People put Fai Chun in their doorways to create a jubilant festive atmosphere, as the phrases written on them translate into good luck and prosperity.

Fai Chun are either square or rectangular in shape, and can be hung vertically or horizontally. A traditional Fai Chun is bright red with black or gold characters inscribed on it with a brush. Similar to the color of fire, the color red was chosen to scare the legendary beast “Nian,” which ate up crops, livestock, and even villagers on the eve of the New Year.

B08I2058
Many families come to the market to spruce up their homes for the New Year by snapping up some fresh flowers and plants. (Image: Monica Song)

Many families also came to the market to spruce up their homes for the New Year by snapping up some fresh flowers and plants. Flower blossoms are believed to bring fortune, according to the popular Chinese saying “blossom flowers bring wealth.” Many purchased time-honored classics like kumquats, lime trees, pussy willows, money plants, and kalanchoes, which are popular for their auspicious-sounding names or colors.

IMG_4258
Performers play traditional Chinese instruments at the market. (Image: Monica Song)

People also came to the market to buy Chinese lanterns. The Lantern Festival is celebrated on the final day of the Chinese New Year. The Lantern Festival is also the first full moon night in the Chinese calendar, marking the return of spring and symbolizing the reunion of family. In the streets of Hong Kong, red colored lanterns set the scene during the Chinese New Year.

Follow us on Twitter or subscribe to our weekly email

 

Monica Song
Born and bred in China, Mona keeps an ever watchful  eye the Chinese news headlines that are worth translating into English for Vision Times readers.

Most Popular

New York Man Writes Free Letters for Strangers

In this age of email, only a few people would actually take the time to write a letter and send it through traditional post....

6 Movies to Stream on Netflix This Lockdown

Being alone in your home during lockdown can be boring and depressing. This is where video streaming websites like Netflix come to the rescue....

New Hubble Space Telescope Data Explains Missing Dark Matter

New data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope provides further evidence for tidal disruption in the galaxy NGC 1052-DF4. This result explains a previous...

China Worst Violator of Religious Freedom, Says PEW Study

A new PEW research study has ranked China at the top of its Government Restrictions Index (GRI) out of 198 nations, noting that the...